Тестові завдання для контролю рівня сформованості вмінь аудіювання студентів-другокурсників

1 Лютого, 20126:22 am

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Тестові завдання для контролю рівня сформованості вмінь аудіювання студентів-другокурсників

Нижче наведено частину дослідження “Контроль рівня сформованості у студентів другого курсу вмінь удіювання“. За цим посиланням ви зможете знайти детальний опис роботи і список джерел.

Тестові завдання для контролю рівня сформованості вмінь аудіювання студентів-другокурсників

LISTENING

MEALS

The usual meals in most countries are breakfast, dinner and supper, but in many families in England as anywhere else four meals are taken a day. Those families in England who eat four meals a day have breakfast (at about 8 or 9 o’clock in the morning), lunch (at about 1 o’clock), tea (at about 5), the so-called afternoon tea and high tea, and dinner (at about 7 or later in the evening). Many working people take their lunch from home and eat it at lunch-time at work. But most workers have it at the canteen of their factory, plant, or mill. Small clerks and businessmen take their lunch at a café, while officials and bigger businessmen have it at a restaurant. In those homes where late dinner is not the custom, supper is taken at about nine or even later. At English hotels and inns meals are served four times a day.

Breakfast usually consists of ham and eggs, bacon and eggs, cold meat, cheese, strong tea or coffee with or without milk, toast and butter, bread and butter and jam, and the like. English toasts are slices of bread, roasted at the surface in the heat. Originally the roasting was done by holding slices of bread on a long fork before the open fire of the fireplace. Now electric toasters are usually used for this purpose. Many people, especially in Scotland, begin their breakfast with some porridge and milk. In the United States sandwiches are the most common article of food. A sandwich consists of two slices of bread (or toast) with some meat, fish, cheese, or caviar or the like between them. Sandwiches are often served with mustard or green peas. The breakfast of the American working family usually contains cornflakes and milk and syrup or some other cereal.

When the table is laid for breakfast, there is a nice white cloth on it with cups, saucers and spoons, a plateful of thin slices of bread, toasts, small plates for fried or boiled eggs, a jar with marmalade or jam (made of currants, raspberries or blackberries), butter, milk, sugar, etc. When all the members of the family have gathered to the table, the housewife pours out the tea or coffee in the cups and adds some milk or cream in it.

Lunch (luncheon), the second meal, is taken at half past twelve or at one o’clock. It usually consists of cold meat, a mutton chop or steak, and some cheese or fruit. Boiled or fried potatoes and salad are also often served.

Afternoon tea is taken in England between 4 and 5 o’clock with bread and butter, toast, biscuits, or cake.

Dinner, which is the principal meal in all the countries, consists of two or three courses. The table is laid with napkins, knives, forks, spoons, plates, dishes for the food, plates for each person and glasses for mineral water. Some people have a little beer or wine. Soup is served in a tureen; meat, veget­ables, puddings – in china and glass dishes.

The first course is some soup or broth. In Ukraine we often begin our dinner with borshch, which is served with meat or sour cream. The second course is usually fish or meat with vegetables, such as: pota­toes, beans, tomatoes, peas, carrots, cabbage, cucumbers, onions, etc., which are seasoned with salt, pepper, vinegar or oil. Ukrainians also like to take golubtsy or varenyky for the second course. Our smetana is practically not known in the English-­speaking countries, though the foreigners who come to Ukraine find our borshch and smetana and other dishes with it delicious. They call it ‘sour cream’ here but take the cream in their home countries, especially with coffee, fresh, before it has gone sour. They also do not know our varenyky and golubtsy, though certainly all these dishes can be had in special restaurants where Russian and Ukrainian meals are served. To some of them they give theirown names, for instance, meat rolls or cabbage rolls for golubtsy.

Dinner is usually finished off with some dessert: stewed fruit, nuts, and other kinds of fruit, all sorts of sweet things. In the United States pies and puddings are common at the end of dinner as final course. In England pudding frequently comes before dessert.

Soda (mineral water) is the usual beverage of the meals. Sometimes there is wine or beer. Wine is extremely dear in England, the United States and Canada, so that the only beverage the working-man can practically afford to have is beer, which is usually neither strong nor tasty.

For supper one often has an omelet(te), or sausage, sometimes cold meat, eggs, and tea or coffee.

PRE-LISTENING:

I. Personalizing.

A teacher asks students questions about the topic of the text so that they can relate it to themselves. The text is on “MEALS”, so he/she asks them such questions as:

How many meals a day do you usually have?

When/at what time do you usually have breakfast/dinner/supper?

What do you usually have for breakfast/dinner/supper?

What is your favourite food?

What is your least favourite food?

Do you ever cook? If so, what do you like to cook?

What is the strangest food you have ever eaten? Did it taste good or bad?

Do you like trying new foods?

Are there any foods that you wouldn’t eat as a child that you eat now?

Do you prefer your own country’s food or other kinds of food?

Has your country ‘adopted’ many foods from other countries?

If you were living abroad, which food would you miss most from this country?

II. Predicting through the title.

A teacher has students predict what the text will be about based on the title “MEALS”.

III. Predicting through the vocabulary.

A teacher gives students a list of key vocabulary items and asks them to predict or guess what the text is about. He/she gives them such key vocabulary items as: meals, breakfast, dinner, supper, lunch, tea, the first course, the second course, dessert, dishes, vegetables, fruit, meat, poultry, spices, canteen, café, restaurant.

IV. Brainstorm.

A teacher asks students to predict words, expressions, or topics likely to appear in the text. He/she writes them on the blackboard.

For example: vegetables (asparagus, aubergine (eggplant), beetroot, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, celery, corn on the cob, courgette (zucchini), cucumber, fennel, garlic, ginger, green beans, green/red pepper, kidney beans, lettuce, marrow, mushroom, onion, parsnip, peas, potato, pumpkin, radish, shallot, spinach, spring onion (leek), sweet potato, tomato, turnip), fruit (apple, apricot, avocado, banana, blackberries, blueberries, cherries, coconut, cranberries, currants, date, fig, gooseberries, grapefruit, grapes, kiwi fruit, lemon, lime, mango, melon, nectarine, orange, papaya (pawpaw), peach, pear, pineapple, plum, raspberries, strawberries, watermelon), spices (chilli, cinnamon, curry, ginger, ketchup, lemon juice, mayonnaise, mustard, nutmeg, oil, pepper, pimento, salad-dressing, salt, sauce/gravy, vanilla, vinegar), kitchen appliances (colander, cup, fork, glass, jar, knife, pan, plate, pot, saucepan, saucer, sieve, spatula, spoon), to add something to something, to bake, to boil, to flavour/season/spice up something with something, to fry, to garnish, to grill, to have another helping of something, to have a snack (a bite of something), to have breakfast, to have dinner, to have lunch, to have supper, to help oneself to something, to lay the table, to overdo, to pass somebody something, to pour (out), to roast, to serve, to sit at table, to steam, to stew, to taste, to underdo.

V. Student-generated questions.

A teacher has students write questions they would like to ask after listening to the text.

For example:

How many meals a day do Ukrainians have?

How many meals a day do the English people have?

What do Ukrainians have for breakfast/dinner/supper?

What do the English people have for breakfast/lunch/dinner/supper?

Then he/she has them listen to the recording and check how many of their questions have been answered.

WHILE-LISTENING:

I. Comparing.

A teacher has students compare the text with their prediction made during pre-listening.

II. Listening for specific information (ticking off items).

A teacher gives students a list of items and asks them to check off/tick off the items that are mentioned while listening.

A list of items: afternoon tea (٧), bacon and eggs (٧), beef, beetroot, beverage (٧), bread and butter and jam (٧), broth (٧), cappuccino and croissant, cold meat (٧), cornflakes (٧), crisps and chocolate, curry, fish and chips, garlic, gooseberries, ham and eggs (٧), high tea (٧), kidney beans, lemon juice, lunch-time (٧), mayonnaise, pizza, porridge (٧), pot, pudding (٧), sandwich (٧), soft and strong drinks, sour cream (٧), stewed fruit (٧), toast and butter (٧), tureen (٧).

III. Putting events/items in the right order.

A teacher gives students a list of items or events mentioned on the tape. Then he/she asks them to read the list, listen to the text, and number the events in the order that they heard them.

A list of events:

Afternoon tea is taken in England between 4 and 5 o’clock with bread and butter, toast, biscuits, or cake. (6)

Breakfast usually consists of ham and eggs, bacon and eggs, cold meat, cheese, strong tea or coffee with or without milk, toast and butter, bread and butter and jam, and the like. (3)

For supper one often has an omelet(te), or sausage, sometimes cold meat, eggs, and tea or coffee. (10)

In the United States pies and puddings are common at the end of dinner as final course. (9)

In those homes where late dinner is not the custom, supper is taken at about nine or even later. (2)

Many people, especially in Scotland, begin their breakfast with some porridge and milk. (4)

The breakfast of the American working family usually contains cornflakes and milk and syrup or some other cereal. (5)

The first course is some soup or broth. (7)

The usual meals in most countries are breakfast, dinner and supper, but in many families in England as anywhere else four meals are taken a day. (1)

Ukrainians also like to take golubtsy or vareniki for the second course. (8)

IV. Note-taking.

A teacher focuses students’ listening by introducing the topics. He/she gives them the task to take notes on these topics when they are mentioned in the text.

For example:

a) Four meals a day in England.

b) Breakfast.

c) Lunch.

d) Afternoon tea.

e) Dinner.

f) Ukrainian food.

POST-LISTENING:

I. Answering questions to show comprehension:

1) Decide whether the following statements are true or false:

Afternoon tea is taken in England between 3 and 4 o’clock with bread and butter, toast, biscuits, or cake. (F)

At English hotels and inns meals are served four times a day. (T)

For supper one often has an omelet(te), or sausage, sometimes cold meat, eggs, and tea or coffee. (T)

In the United States cornflakes are the most common article of food. (F)

In the United States pastries are common at the end of dinner as final course. (F)

Many people, especially in Scotland, begin their breakfast with some porridge and milk. (T)

Small clerks and businessmen take their lunch at the canteen, while officials and bigger businessmen have it at work. (F)

Soda is extremely dear in England, the United States and Canada, so that the only beverage the working-man can practically afford to have is beer, which is usually neither strong nor tasty. (F)

The breakfast of the American working family usually contains cornflakes and milk and syrup or some other cereal. (T)

The usual meals in most countries are breakfast, lunch, dinner and supper. (F)

Those families in England who eat four meals a day have dinner at about 3 o’clock. (F)

Those families in England who eat four meals a day have lunch at about 1 o’clock. (T)

2) Choose the right answer for each question (multiple-choice).

– How many meals a day do most countries have?

a)     4;

b)    5;

c)     3.

– How many meals a day do the English people have?

a)     3;

b)    4;

c)     5.

– When do those families in England who eat four meals a day have dinner?

a)     at 3 o’clock;

b)    at 5 o’clock;

c)     at 7 o’clock.

– Where do small clerks and businessmen take their lunch?

a)     at the canteen and at work;

b)    at a café and at a restaurant;

c)     at home.

– What is the most common article of food in the United States?

a)    sandwiches;

b)    cornflakes;

c)     toasts.

– What does the breakfast of the American working family usually contain?

a)     sandwiches;

b)    cornflakes and milk and syrup;

c)     porridge and milk.

– What does afternoon tea consist of?

a)     cappuccino and croissant;

b)    crisps and chocolate;

c)     bread and butter, toast, biscuits, or cake.

– What is practically not known in the English-­speaking countries, though the foreigners who come to Ukraine find our borshch and other dishes with it delicious?

a)     vareniki;

b)    smetana;

c)     golubtsy.

What is common at the end of dinner as final course in the United States?

a)    pies and puddings;

b)    pastries;

c)     sweets.

– What is extremely dear in England, the United States and Canada, so that the only beverage the working-man can practically afford to have is beer, which is usually neither strong nor tasty?

a)     soda;

b)    juice;

c)     wine.

II. Jigsaw listening.

A teacher asks different groups of students to listen to the same recording but listen for different information.

For example:

  1. Four meals a day in England.
  2. Breakfast.
  3. Lunch.
  4. Afternoon tea.
  5. Dinner.
  6. Ukrainian food.

Then he/she switches up the groups so that students can exchange information to perform a task.

III. Writing as a post-listening activity.

1) A teacher asks students to make up a dialogue “At Breakfast Table” using the following words and phrases:

to have/take breakfast; to sit at table; bread and butter; hard boiled eggs; sausage; ham; cheese; sweets; strong coffee/tea; weak coffee/tea; milk; sugar; sugar-basin; lumps of sugar; to stir the coffee/tea with a spoon; coffee/tea is ready; are you ready for another cup of coffee/tea; no more, thanks; I have had my fill; how do you find …; to wash up the cups.

2) A teacher asks students to make a menu for: a dinner at a restaurant or a dinner party.

IV. Speaking as a post-listening activity.

A teacher asks students to imagine they are going to open their own restaurant. In groups they prepare a brief presentation describing their restaurant, using the following headings:

– size;

– type of food;

– drinks;

– atmosphere;

– music;

– clientele;

– theme/entertainment.